Musings on My Friend the Ticking Clock

I love clocks. I think they can be beautiful decorations in a home. Growing up, we had a massive clock over the mantle in the living room. It didn’t even work, but I always loved the piece. But clocks obviously do something besides hang on the wall: they keep time. And some of them tick to do so. I have a clock on my desk that ticks, and as I’ve been working from home, I’ve realized that, at least in my view, ticking clocks tend to get a bad rap. Continue reading

Hills and History at Harpers Ferry

It was 80 degrees on Sunday. In April. I got a sunburn. In April. Though that part is beside the point. I guess for the last couple weeks it has been unseasonably chilly in the D.C. area, so it was pretty exciting when it warmed up for a few days last week, even if the warm-up was also an unseasonable event. Nevertheless, we took advantage with a trip to Harpers Ferry, and it was a wonderful adventure. Continue reading

Decorating with Maps

In my 20s, the idea of purchasing “art” for my apartment has always seemed daunting. Instead, I’ve leaned on the home and design sections of stores like Target and Bed, Bath and Beyond, choosing things that could often be classified more as “signs” than as pieces of art. Over the last couple years, we’ve discovered that we’re partial to the look of prints on canvas, which is fortuitous considering the canvas pieces are often slightly less expensive than the prints or photographs. And in this apartment, we’ve added a couple more variations on a classic object that can prove to be very eye-catching: the map! Continue reading

What I’m Reading: Hurts to Love You

I recently expanded my reading interests into a new genre: romance. At first, this was purely because I was going on a trip, was almost finished with the novel I was reading, I’d received a couple romance novels in the mail from publishers and the books themselves are very small. So I tossed one in my bag. And I’ll admit, by the end I was hooked. So I started to do a little more research into the genre (more on why will be coming soon), and decided that my next foray should be into contemporary romance (the first one was historical). So I again went into the stash of novels I had on hand, and selected Alisha Rai’s Hurts to Love You. Continue reading

Mexican-Style Pulled Pork Tacos

I’m not a huge fan of tacos. I’m a big believer in the idea of volumetrics—the idea that if you bulk up your meal with healthy ingredients like veggies, it’s going to be more filling and satisfying, even if you aren’t necessarily eating more calories. It’s why I love bowl-style meals, because you can keep adding and mixing things in. Now, all that being said, these tacos are the exception. The sauce is so rich and flavorful that you want to eat slowly, savoring every bite, so by the time you finish to taco number three, you’ve had more than enough. Continue reading

Narwhals: The Elusive Unicorns of the Sea

While we were living in Hoboken, we got a good amount of invitations over the years to alumni events sponsored by Trinity College, our alma mater. However, I never found any particularly interesting, or worth the often high price tag. So I was excited when, just a few months after moving the D.C. area, I received an invite for an event I immediately wanted to attend: a tour of the exhibit on narwhals at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. Continue reading

What I’m Reading: The Lost Letter

About two years ago, I went through a phase in which I read a bunch of historical fiction books in a row that were all very similar to one another: they all had at least one storyline that took place during the Holocaust, and another that took place in a different era, either before or after. As both narratives moved along, connections were revealed between the two stories, building to an emotional climax revealing the true power of the human spirit. If this sounds glib, I don’t mean it to; I love these books. I find them inspirational, heart-wrenching and heartwarming. And the novel with which I decided to revisit the genre, Jillian Cantor’s The Lost Letter, was no exception. Continue reading